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eGov Masterplans

Vision & Strategic Thrusts

e-Government Action Plan (2000-2003)
All government services that can be delivered electronically shall be delivered through electronic means


Vision

To be a leading e-Government that will better serve the nation in the Digital Economy.

Strategic Thrusts
 

Re-inventing Government in the Digital Economy
Delivering Integrated Electronic Services
Being Proactive and Responsive
Using ICT to Build New Capabilities and Capacities
Innovating with ICT

Re-inventing Government in the Digital Economy

Governance in the Digital Economy requires a thorough understanding of the impact of ICT on internal processes in the public sector and transactions with citizens and businesses. The Digital Economy demands rigorous reviews of policies, regulations and processes to ensure that the e-Government initiative is up to speed with the rapid developments in the economy, and to meet the public's rising expectations. Public officers must therefore be prepared to embrace change by revamping their tried and tested methods in the process of transforming government.

Delivering Integrated Electronic Services

Increasingly, citizens will want public services to be delivered online, anytime and anywhere, at their convenience. The Singapore Government has set an ambitious goal for its Public Service.

"Key public services will be delivered electronically by year 2001. Government agencies will streamline their processes to be more customer-oriented, delivering services with the citizens' needs in mind rather than the convenience of the agencies."
DPM Lee Hsien Loong
at COMDEX/Asia, Singapore Informatics 98

Greater value will be created for the public if electronic services are integrated and centred on customers' needs. The end objective is to provide a convenient one-stop, continuous service portal for the public. The government's eCitizen Centre initiative embodies this concept. It requires government agencies to work across boundaries to integrate information, processes and systems, so as to provide a seamless online experience for its citizens and customers.

Being Proactive and Responsive

Government agencies do not have the luxury of time to develop new policies, systems and services, as implementation time for new services becomes an important consideration. Increasingly, government agencies will have to adopt the same "sense and respond" approach as the private sector in anticipating citizens' needs, and delivering responsive systems and services with speed. Existing services and processes also need to be further fine-tuned to meet customers' changing needs, as well as to keep abreast with new technological possibilities.

Using ICT to Build New Capabilities and Capacities

Government agencies must learn to re-engineer government processes to benefit from the new business models of the Internet era. This will help to enhance internal processes, and build new capabilities and capacities. Appropriate systems and infrastructures will be needed to support the change. Towards this end, public officers will need to acquire necessary skills and tools to make them effective knowledge workers. They must be able to access systems and information anytime and anywhere, as tele-commuting becomes more prevalent.

Innovating with ICT

To be a leading e-Government, innovation and experimentation are fundamental. Public officers must therefore be prepared to experiment with, innovate and exploit new technologies to deliver government services more effectively. They must be prepared to be benchmarked against private sector e-commerce practices and other leading e-Governments.
When initiating new projects, public officers need to think radically; execute with speed by starting small to deliver value quickly; and scale up quickly once the pilot has been proven to be successful.